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What Kind of Stick Should I Buy?

There is a huge variety of sticks available on the market.  Hopefully this will give a little background and help you navigate through the options!

* After reading below, if you are still not sure what to get and need further help, an easy solution is to go to one of the local lacrosse dealers.  They would be more than happy to talk options and the best fit for your player:

- Universal Lacrosse:  235 W State St, Doylestown, PA 18901  Phone:(267) 880-1988  www.universallacrosse.com   

- Dicks Sporting Goods:  Montgomery Mall,  113 Montgomery Mall,  North Wales, PA 19454

- Sports Authority:  Montgomeryville, 801 Bethlehem Pike, North Wales, PA 19454

The lacrosse stick is to a lacrosse player, what a baseball glove is to a baseball player.  The stick is the single most important piece of lacrosse equipment.  It can be very individualized with distinguishable characteristics in how it throws, as well as how it "feels" when a ball is in the stick.

Sticks and can be purchased as a whole stick, or in pieces (“Head” & “Handle”).  There are many stick head options as well as stringing differences of the “Pocket” available within.  There are also many different handles for these sticks which are made of various metals.  These metals range from the least expensive and least durable, like aluminum - to expensive and most durable, like titanium and a variety of metal composites.  In addition, many sticks are marketed toward certain positions as well.

Coach’s Pick: For our younger beginners, purchase a “whole stick”.  An aluminum shaft is fine, and should last into the 6th-8th grade when kids start making harder “checks," which can eventually bend an aluminum shaft.

There are 2 main varieties for the “Pocket” of the stick, “Soft Mesh” and “Hard Mesh”.  There are advantages and disadvantages to each:  Soft mesh is the less expensive, and will give the user a little more “feel” when the ball is in the pocket of the stick.  The down side to soft mesh is it is not very durable and must be maintained for consistency... especially if it gets wet or muddy.  “Hard mesh” is much more durable and has a more consistency for throwing.  It also will last many more seasons than soft mesh.  However, the down side is a little less "feeling" when the ball in the stick, and it costs a little bit more. 

Coach’s Pick:  “Hard” mesh for consistency and durability.

Examples of sticks on the market:
- Warrior Outlaw:  Very “basic”.  Okay at the K- 2 grade levels, but they will not be happy with it for long.  Very “basic” for play made with a “soft mesh” pocket.

- Fiddle STX lacrosse set:  This is a “play” set... TONS of fun in the backyard and the shore (We have at least half a dozen in my house).  This is NOT what we want to use for regular season play.

- STX Stinger: A better option than the Warrior Outlaw.  Is strung with a “soft mesh” pocket.

- Brine Youth Alias: Although still soft mesh, it offers a better strung pocket that provides more ball control than the above sticks.  However, I only found it with a long defensive shaft attached.  Per league rules, full length defensive handles may be used starting at the 5th/6th grade division.

- STX AV8-U:  A good beginner stick at a good price.  Strung with a soft mesh pocket- it has the same stringing as the Alias (A “pocket” that offers more ball control).

Coach's Pick:  It’s a little more expensive priced around $45: Maverik Bad Boy Attack/Midfield Complete Lacrosse Stick.  This is the least expensive stick I found with “Hard mesh".  It also has a better strung pocket, offering more control.

* Special Note:  In many respects you “get what you pay for” with lacrosse sticks.  However, at the younger age group, I wouldn't purchase any model that is more expensive than the one below.  It is the same stick I bought for my son many years ago, and offers the best of what is described above for the price:  Warrior Swarm X ($59.99)   

I hope that wasn't completely overwhelming and answered all your questions!  Again, you are still not sure what to get for your player, the best solution is to go to one of the local lacrosse dealers who would be more than happy to talk options and the best fit for your player.